Does Sacramento Allow DUI Checkpoints?

Have you been caught in a DUI checkpoint? It can be incredibly frustrating when you’ve been ticketed for driving under the influence, but you weren’t actually pulled over because your driving was poor; rather, you were “caught” in a checkpoint.

Sacramento does allow DUI checkpoints, but there are some rules associated with them. If you know more about these rules, you may be able to avoid the checkpoints entirely, or you could fight against a DUI charge.

Fighting a charge may seem intimidating, but there’s often a way to win. If the officers at the checkpoint didn’t follow the law perfectly, you can prove that your rights were violated. Read on for more information on the rules in California pertaining to DUI checkpoints.

The DUI Checkpoint Rules in Sacramento

The following are some of the rules that California law requires those in charge of DUI checkpoints to follow.

  • The checkpoint must be in a reasonable and safe location.
  • The method of stopping drivers (e.g. every third car) must be random.
  • The supervising officers are the ones who can make operating decisions.
  • Reasonable safety precautions must be taken.
  • The time and location of the DUI checkpoint must be in good judgment.
  • The checkpoint must show that it’s an official stopping place.
  • Roadblocks must also be advertised in advance, publicly.

If the DUI checkpoint where you were stopped doesn’t adhere to these rules, then you will have an excellent case if you’re trying to fight against your DUI charge.

Fighting a DUI Charge

If you believe that something was amiss at the DUI checkpoint where you were stopped you could try fighting against your charge. There are ways to keep a drunk driving crime off your record, but you won’t be able to do so if you plead guilty to the crime. Once the charge is on your record it’s there to stay. You will be affected by your charge for life.

Negative Consequences of a Sacramento DUI Conviction

There are many negative effects of receiving a DUI conviction. For starters, the DUI can make it very difficult for you to secure good employment, or you could even lose your job if convicted. Some employers won’t even consider an applicant that has a DUI on their record, or that has any crime on their record.

Your crime could also greatly impact your finances, if you can’t get a job because of the crime on your record. It can also keep you from earning a better wage in the future.

You could also be forced to pay substantial DUI fines, and there are almost certainly license-related fees. Not to mention the cost of an ignition interlock device, which all those who are convicted of a DUI in Sacramento are forced to install in their vehicle, regardless of whether it was a first offense.

Other negative effects of a DUI conviction include:

  • Family life will be affected
  • Embarrassment/humiliation
  • Self-esteem
  • Can impact future sentencing for other crimes

Need Some Help from a DUI Attorney in the Sacramento Area?

Have you been charged with a DUI? Whether you were stopped at a checkpoint or an officer pulled you over, that conviction will change your life. Get help keeping a charge off your record by working with a DUI lawyer in Sacramento.

Strange Laws in Illinois

Every state in the U.S. has laws. It is what keeps peace and harmony in the state. Laws also make people safe. Illinois, like all states, have laws and most of them make sense. There are certain laws in the State of Illinois; however, that just don’t make sense. To learn more about strange laws in Illinois, read on.

In Normal, Illinois, it is Against the Law to Urinate on Street Signs

This law was written after what people call the “beer riot”. It occurred in the early 80’s. According to this law, residents are not allowed to urinate on street signs. There are a few things that make this law crazy. First, it is illegal to urinate on any public street. Second, to urinate on a street sign, it would take a lot of skill. In Champaign, Illinois, it is illegal to urinate in your neighbor’s mouth. This law is beyond bizarre.

In Decatur, Don’t Drive without a Steering Wheel

If you don’t have a steering wheel in your car while driving, you could be arrested. In theory, this law makes sense. However, if you know anything about cars, you know that you couldn’t possibly drive without a steering wheel. Since it would be impossible, this is a pretty strange law.

In Mount Pulaski, Snowball Fights are Sexist

In this town it is illegal for girls to throw snowballs but boys are allowed. This is a pretty sexist law which leads you to believe that it was written decades ago. On a snow day, boys can participate in a snowball fight but girls cannot. There is a good chance that the law isn’t enforced because if a boy hits a girl with a snowball, she should be allowed to throw one back.

In Bloomington, You Cannot Feed the Birds if You Live within a Mile of Downtown Square

This law makes sense in theory. If you feed the birds within a mile of downtown, they will flock to your home looking for more food. This can result is noise and bird droppings being left on people in the square. Since the police aren’t going to search residents’ yards for bird feeders, it is a pretty strange law.

It is Illegal to Hang Anything from Your Rearview Mirror

Most people buy air fresheners to hang from their rearview mirror to keep their cars smelling nice. Others hang their baby’s shoes from the mirror, and some hang big fuzzy dice. If you live in Illinois, you might want to think twice about hanging anything from your mirror because it is illegal. This is an odd law since drivers all over the country hang things from their rearview mirror.

In Galesburg, You Cannot Own a Smelly Dog

Nobody likes a dog that smells. Officials in Galesburg, Illinois hate it so much that they wrote a law that makes it illegal. It is hard to see how this law can be enforced, however. The chances that the police go door to door smelling dogs are slim to none.

You Will be Fined if You Beat a Rat With a Baseball Bat in Galesburg

Most people don’t like rats. However, they wouldn’t go as far as beating them with a baseball bat. If you are sick enough to do this and you live in Galesburg, you can be fined $1,000. It might be cheaper to hire an exterminator.

You Can be Fined for Mispronouncing Joliet

The Town Fathers in Joliet hated when people mispronounced the name of their town. Many people pronounced it, Jolly-Ette. They hated it so much that they made mispronouncing the town’s name a misdemeanor which is punishable by a $5 fine. Talk about being strict. If you do break this law and somehow you are arrested, the lawyers Hipskind & McAninch, LLC can help.

In Kirkland, Bees are Not Allowed to Fly Over the Town or Over the Street

This is a pretty strange law considering it is the bee that would be prosecuted. If a bee does fly in no-fly zones, is it taken to jail? Will it sting the arresting officer first? Is this a crime? This is a really crazy law.

In Moline, it is Illegal to Ice Skate During July or August

This law is insane, because how can one go ice skating in Moline during July and August when these are the hottest months of the year?

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_incidents_of_civil_unrest_in_the_United_States

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bird_feeding

New Mexico Personal Injury Lawsuit Checklist

People who are injured by someone else’s negligence in New Mexico have the opportunity to bring a personal injury case in New Mexico civil courts. However, if you are hurt by a government employee or agency, the situation will need to adhere to different rules that dictate tort claims against government agencies, employees and entities in New Mexico. The following article will explain the key points or rules pertaining to a case of this nature.

The New Mexico tort claims act states that government employees and entities are granted immunity from liability for any tort. However, exceptions do exist and that leads to the next question.

What Does the Act Cover?

According to this tort claims act, it insinuates that government employees and entities cannot be held liable even if they cause harm to a private person or company. However there are several exceptions and it is possible to seek compensation from the government in New Mexico if you are injured as a result of a car accidents whereby the car was driven by a government employee who was carrying out his duties at the time. You may also qualify for compensation if your injuries resulted from dangerous or defective property such as a slip and fall incidents or even a physical attack caused by inefficient security or perhaps even a physical attack by a government employee.

You may also seek compensation for medical malpractice caused by a government employee who was working in the healthcare institution. Negligence claims pertaining to maintenance of public roads and streets or construction including pictures, sidewalks, alleys and parking lots are also allowed. Compensation may also be given for injuries arising from the way of government or any of its employees working at an airport.

Since exceptions do exist for every possible scenario, meaning that there are exceptions to the exceptions, it is advisable that you read over New Mexico’s statutes and also speak to a qualified attorney or personal injury lawyer before pursuing a personal injury claim against the government.

If you believe that you stand a good chance of receiving compensation for your injuries, then your claim must be filed within two years of the date of injury. However, if the injured person is younger than seven years, at the time of injury, that individual has until his or her ninth birthday to file a claim. The rule is that if the claim is not filed within the two-year period, it will not be heard in court.

In cases of damages under the new tort claims act, the government can be expected to pay approximately $200,000 for property damage, $300,000 for past and future medical expenses and $400,000 for damages not resulting from property damage or medical bills.  Ultimately, under the new act, the government will not pay more than $750,000 to any individual for damages in any one claim. Injured parties are also not allowed to seek punitive damages in claims against the New Mexico government. In addition to bringing a lawsuit against the state government, victims of personal injury can also bring claims against the local and municipal government bodies in New Mexico.

https://www.nmcourts.gov/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personal_injury